Former England seamer Mike Hendrick dies at the age of 72

Former England seamer Mike Hendrick dies at the age of 72


England seamer Mike Hendrick bowled with unbelievable economic system and performed a job in two Ashes triumphs however lacked the luck wanted to emerge from the shadow of Botham and Willis

  • (*72*)Mike Hendrick has died aged 72 after a battle with bowel and liver most cancers
  • (*72*)Seamer took 87 wickets in 30 Tests for England at a mean of 25.83 apiece
  • (*72*)Hendrick performed a component in two successful Ashes collection and excelled in ODIs
  • (*72*)But he was an unfortunate bowler, creating a status for beating the bat 
  • (*72*)It was Hendrick’s misfortune his profession coincided with Botham and Willis  

There could by no means have been an unluckier bowler than Mike Hendrick, the former England, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire seamer who has died at the age of 72 after battling bowel and liver most cancers.

Not solely did his Test profession coincide with Bob Willis and Ian Botham, usually relegating him to first change, however he developed a status for beating the bat with out reward. 

In 30 Tests, he by no means took a five-for, but nonetheless averaged 25 – the similar as Willis, higher than Botham.

Mike Hendrick, who has died at the age of 72, with arms aloft after dismissing India's Dilip Vengsarkar at Lord's during their tour of England in 1979

 Mike Hendrick, who has died at the age of 72, with arms aloft after dismissing India’s Dilip Vengsarkar at Lord’s throughout their tour of England in 1979

Tall, barely hunched and normally undemonstrative, Hendrick was regarded by Mike Brearley, one of his England captains, as ‘steadier and extra constant’ than his team-mates, ‘an admirable foil to their adventurous aptitude’.

As if to show the level, his ODI economy-rate of 3.27 stays the finest of any England bowler, as does his common of 19. 

And he was the main wicket-taker at the 1979 World Cup, when he was famously launched for six by Viv Richards off the final ball of West Indies’ innings in the Lord’s closing.  

Hendrick bowls for England against Australia in a one-day match at Edgbaston in 1981

Hendrick bowls for England in opposition to Australia in a one-day match at Edgbaston in 1981

Hendrick (centre) engrossed in a game of table cricket with England colleagues Bob Willis (left), Derek Randall (second left), David Gower (second right) and Ian Botham (right) before flying to Australia in 1978

Hendrick (centre) engrossed in a recreation of desk cricket with England colleagues Bob Willis (left), Derek Randall (second left), David Gower (second proper) and Ian Botham (proper) earlier than flying to Australia in 1978

Hendrick in the colours of the MCC ahead of a tour match with Australia in 1977

Hendrick in the colors of the MCC forward of a tour match with Australia in 1977

Hendrick was satisfied he had Richards lbw on 22; usually, the umpire disagreed.

Some felt he would have loved much more success had he pitched the ball additional up, and Ken Barrington – the former Test batsman who turned England’s tour supervisor – would encourage him to get the batsman ‘in two-man’s land’.

Hendrick, whose modus operandi was profitable sufficient to carry him 770 first-class wickets at simply 20 apiece (together with almost 500 for Derbyshire), discovered the criticism irritating.

‘It was usually mentioned that I bowled too brief, and that if I’d pitched it up I’d have gotten extra folks out,’ he informed Wisden. ‘The one factor I might say is: ‘How does anyone know that?!’

When the drive was with him, because it was throughout a spell of 4 for 3 in eight balls in opposition to Pakistan in the 1979 World Cup, he was greater than a handful. ‘I most likely had a bit of luck for as soon as,’ he mentioned.

He performed the final of his Tests throughout the 1981 Ashes, although he missed out on the epic at Headingley at the final minute after Willis persuaded chairman of selectors Alec Bedser he was match. 

Hendrick takes revenge on Rod Hull's Emu, cricket ball in beak, in a picture taken in 1981

Hendrick takes revenge on Rod Hull’s Emu, cricket ball in beak, in an image taken in 1981

Hendrick’s invitation, despatched in the submit these days to gamers’ counties, needed to be intercepted by Derbyshire officers earlier than he might open it. 

On the final day of the Test, Willis took eight for 43 as England received after following on.

Hendrick went on to participate in England’s first insurgent tour of apartheid South Africa in 1981-82, and retired after his third season at Notts in 1984. 

Of his most cancers, he lately informed Mike Atherton: ‘I’m in the departure lounge, however the flight has not fairly left but.’

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