Tokyo Olympics: Organisers tell winners NOT to bite medals – they’re made of recycled electronics

Tokyo Olympics: Organisers tell winners NOT to bite medals – they’re made of recycled electronics


Olympics organisers tell winners NOT to bite their medals on the rostrum as they pose for images – as a result of they’re really made of recycled cell phones!

Victory should style fairly nice – or at the very least that is what it appears every time an Olympic winner bites into their medal whereas posing for pictures on the rostrum.

Now Tokyo 2020 Olympics organisers have taken to Twitter to remind athletes that the medals are ‘not edible, and are literally made from recycled digital units donated by the Japanese public.

‘So, you do not have to bite them… however we all know you continue to will,’ the cheeky tweet learn. 

With the Games happening amid rising Covid charges in Japan, the pleasant recommendation got here as overjoyed athletes from many countries copied the previous custom of taking a bite. 

Britain’s Adam Peaty and Tom Daley every took a fake bite out of their gold medals, whereas Team USA stars and the complete Estonian fencing staff all adopted go well with.  

Team Great Britain's Adam Peaty, 26, bit into his gold medal after winning the 100-metre breaststroke on day three of the Tokyo Games

Team Great Britain’s Adam Peaty, 26, bit into his gold medal after profitable the 100-metre breaststroke on day three of the Tokyo Games

But perhaps they would not in the event that they realised what number of pairs of fingers their medals have been by means of. The Tokyo 2020 Medal Project took two years of nationwide effort to acquire sufficient devices to produce round 5,000 gold, silver and bronze medals that will likely be given out on the Olympics. 

The recycling marketing campaign produced a complete of 32kg of gold, 3,492.7kg of silver and a pair of,199.9kg of bronze from practically 80 tons of previous cell phones, laptops and different units.

Biting into gold dates again to World War I earlier than the Olympics gave out the primary strong-gold medal in 1904. They gave out the final one in 1912.

Team Italy's Luigui Samele, 34, takes a bite of the silver medal he won in the men's individual final Sabre competition

Team Italy’s Luigui Samele, 34, takes a bite of the silver medal he gained within the males’s particular person remaining Sabre competitors

Anastasija Zolotic, 18,  poses on the podium after winning Team USA's first women's taekwondo Olympic gold

Team USA's gold medallist Lee Kiefer, 27, bit into her medal at a victory ceremony for the women's foil fencing individual event

Team USA’s Anastasija Zolotic, 18, poses on the rostrum after profitable the primary girls’s taekwondo Olympic gold for her nation.  Gold medallist Lee Kiefer, 27,  of Team USA bit into her medal at a victory ceremony for the ladies’s foil fencing particular person occasion

Team Estonia pose at the award ceremony of the women's Epee Team competition after Tokyo's fencing events. Froom left to right: Gold medallists Julia Beljajeva, Irina Embrich, Erika Kirpu and Katrina Lehis

Team Estonia pose on the award ceremony of the ladies’s Epee Team competitors after Tokyo’s fencing occasions. Froom left to proper: Gold medallists Julia Beljajeva, Irina Embrich, Erika Kirpu and Katrina Lehis

Traders bit into the steel to take a look at its authenticity. Because gold is delicate and malleable, if a bite left indentations, the steel was most certainly actual. 

Modern Olympic medals are extra like idiot’s gold (they’re made of just one per cent gold) and Olympians would break their tooth if they really tried the bite take a look at. 

The follow has turn into extra of a photograph-worthy, medal-profitable second and has been a trending podium pose all through the Tokyo Games. 

‘It’s turn into an obsession with the photographers,’ Olympic historian David Wallechinsky advised CNN.

‘I believe they have a look at it as an iconic shot, as one thing that you would be able to in all probability promote. I do not suppose it is one thing the athletes would in all probability do on their very own.’

The Tokyo 2020 organisers took to Twitter to remind the athletes that 'the medals are not edible,' because they're made from recycled electronic devices donated by the Japanese public

The Tokyo 2020 organisers took to Twitter to remind the athletes that ‘the medals usually are not edible,’ as a result of they’re made from recycled digital units donated by the Japanese public

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